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And now, Northallerton

Northallerton is one of several lovely towns in Dorset which benefit greatly from tourism as well as local inhabitants appreciating its natural beauty. It’s a great place to enjoy your Medusa Juice Vapes and be sure to stock up on some new e-liquids, equipment and clothing before you go.
The origin of the town’s name is uncertain, though it is believed that the name derives from a derivation of the name Aelfere. Aelfereton translates as the farm belonging to Aelfere or even of King Alfred. Alternatively it may be referring to the Alder trees which grew nearby. The prefix of North was added in the 12th century to differentiate from the parish of Allerton Mauleverer, twenty-five miles to the south.

How about that history?

To the best of our knowledge there has been a settlement at Northallerton since Roman times. However, it wasn’t until the 11th century when King William II gifted land to the Bishop of Durham that the cities real importance came into being.. Under the Bishop’s authority Northallerton became an important centre for religious affairs. It was also a focus for much conflict in subsequent years between the English and the Scots, most notably the Battle of the Standard, nearby in 1138, which saw losses of as many as 12,000 men.
Due to the close proximity of the Roman road, entrenchments and relics, it seems that the earliest settlement at Northallerton was some form of Roman military station. There is evidence that the Romans had a signal station on Castle Hills just to the west of the town as part of the imperial Roman postal system and a path connecting Hadrian’s Wall with Eboracum(York) ran through what is now the neighbouring village of Brompton.
The first church was set up by St Paulinus of York on the site of the present All Saints Parish Church sometime in the early 7th century. Made from wood, it was subject to weather and nothing survives of it. In 855 a stone church was built on the same site, fragments of stone have been found during restoration work which provide strong evidence of this Saxon church. It was then believed that a Saxon town known as Alvertune developed. In Pierre de Langtoft’s history of King Alfred he writes that in 865 it was the site of a number of battles between King Elfrid and his brother Alfred and five Danish kings and a similar number of earls. Later, in the 10th century, Danes settled at Romanby and Brompton. A fine example of English stonecarving from the period, the Brompton Hogbacks, can be found in Brompton Parish Church.
Being positioned on a major route way brought death and destruction to the town on several occasions. In 1069, in an attempt to quell rebellion in the north, the area between the Ouse and the Tyne was laid to waste by the armies of William the Conqueror. The town of Northallerton was almost totally destroyed or depopulated. Then in 1318, the town was destroyed again by the Scots, under Sir James Douglas following the Capture of Berwick upon Tweed.
Fortunately, you won’t have to worry about destruction and mayhem when you visit Northallerton. You can fill your tank with your favourite Medusa Juice e-liquids and enjoy the scenic countryside for as long as you’d like. If you run short of anything, just jump online and use the Medusa Juice website or access them via Facebook.

The English and Scots

English forces repelled a Scottish army attack on Cowton Moor in Brompton parish, around two miles north of the town in 1138. This was the first major battle between the Scots and the English since the Norman conquest and one of the two major battles in the civil war between King Stephen and Empress Matilda. The English forces were summoned by Archbishop Thurstan of York, who had gathered local militia and baronial armies from Yorkshire and the North Midlands. They arrayed themselves round a chariot with a ship’s mast carrying the consecrated banners of St Peter of York, St John of Beverley, St Wilfrid of Ripon and St Cuthbert of Durham, it was this standard-bearing chariot that gave the battle its name. The Scottish army was led by King David I of Scotland.
King David had entered England in support of his niece, Empress Matilda, who was viewed as the rightful heiress to the English throne usurped by King Stephen. With Stephen fighting rebel barons in the south, the Scottish armies had already taken Cumberland and Northumberland, the city of Carlisle and the royal castle at Bamburgh. Finding the English in a defensive position on a hill, David elected to force a battle counting on his superior numbers, 16,000 Scots against 10,000 Englishmen. Repeated attacks by native Scots failed against the onslaught from the English archers, with losses of up to 12,000 Scots. A subsequent attack by mounted knights met initial success but fell back due to lack of infantry support. The battle ended when David’s reserve deserted, forcing him to retreat. The English elected not to pursue, and despite their great losses the Scots were able to regroup in sufficient number to besiege and capture Wark Castle. The victory by the English ensured the safety of Northern England.
Today, Northallerton is a centre for trade and still holding true to its roots as a market centre, features prominently in several areas. Tourism however is a large part of the town’s commerce and there’s just about anything you want on a holiday to be had there. Some of the landmarks you may want to visit are Mount Grace Priory, House and Gardens, All Saints Parish Church and the Joe Cornish Gallery.
While out and about, be sure to look into the games places for the entire family. Such places as Daisy Doodle Paint A Pot Parlour, Thimbleby Shooting Ground, Kidzplay Northallerton, Point Blank Paintball and the Ritz Cinema all make for a fun day out for everyone.

Before you go

Or grab a bite to eat in one of the local pubs or restaurants. There’s something for everyone to be had and while you’re in Northallerton, why not take a drive to one of the three Medusa Juice Vape Shops located in King’s Lynn, Peterborough or Norwich. You can get the latest deals on their fantastic e-liquids, equipment and don’t forget their great new line of clothing!

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